HOW TO PREVENT THE PROBLEM OF SHORT ELEMENT LIFE

HOW TO PREVENT THE PROBLEM OF SHORT ELEMENT LIFE
1. The inlet must be located away from heavy dust concentrations.
2. Check the inlet location; make it sure that exhaust gases are directed above and away from the air cleaner inlet. Soot from exhaust is a prime enemy of paper filters.
3. The air supply to the air cleaner must be must be of adequate size and unrestricted.
4. Check the air cleaner to make sure it is the correct size for the engine.
5. The air cleaner element must be new when installed. It is not good practice to clean air cleaner, it could be damaged in this process.
6. Make sure the clean air ducting after the air cleaner is unrestricted and it is of adequate size.
7. Check the service indicator for damage, working lock-up function, and correct calibration per engine manufacturers recommendation.
HOW TO PREVENT THE PROBLEM OF DUST/DIRT AIRBORNE CONTAMINANTS ENTERING THE ENGINE
1. Make sure the element has not been damaged in handling. Examine for dents
and holes.
2. Be certain that all gasket are sealing. Examine for dust trails, which indicate
leaks. Check to be sure wing nut is tight.
3. Examine the clean air transfer tubing for cracks, loose clamps, or loose
flange joints.
4. Check air compressor connections (if used) to be certain these are leak free.
5. Check ether fittings (if used) to be certain no contaminants are entering
the engine through these connections.


 
IMPORTANT STEPS TO FOLLOW
(Every time an air cleaner element is replaced)
Note: Be sure to empty the pre-cleaner bowl or cup as required


1. Remove the old element as gently as possible

Carefully remove the dirty element, until you get it clear of the housing. Accidentally
bumping it while still inside will result in dust and dirt contaminating the
clean side of the filter housing, before the new element has chance to do its
job.

2. Always clean the inside of the housing carefully

Dirt left in air cleaner housing spells trouble for your engine. Always use
a clean damp cloth to wipe every surface clean. Check it visually to make sure
it is clean before putting in a new element.

3. Always clean the gasket sealing surfaces of the housing.

An improper gasket seal is one of the most common causes of engine contamination.
Make sure that all hardened dirt ridges are completely removed, both on the
bottom and top of the cleaner.

4. Check for uneven dirt patterns on your old element

Your old element is a valuable clue to dust leakage or gasket sealing problems.
A pattern on the element clean side is a sign that the old element was not firmly
sealed or that a dust leak exists. Make certain the cause of that leak is identified
and rectified before replacing the element.

5. Press your fresh gasket to see if it springs back

Make sure your new element is made with a highly compressible gasket that springs
right back when your finger pressure is released. A quality gasket is one of
the most important parts of the element.

6. Make sure the gasket is seating properly

If you don’t feel the gasket is seating evenly for perfect seal, then
you don’t have adequate protection. Rechecking to see if the sealing surface
in the housing is clean, or if the element is the correct part number. It may
be the wrong size for the housing.

 



 WARNING!
1. Don’t remove element for inspection

Such a check will always do more harm to your engine than good. Ridges of dirt
on the gasket sealing surface can drop on the clean filter side when the gasket
is released. Stick to the manufacturers recommended schedule. If you have fitted
a restriction indicator, use this as a guide. If you are in any doubt about
the reliability of the indicator, fit a new one.

2. Never rap an element to clean it-except to
destroy it


Rapping hard enough to knock off dust often damages the element and destroys
your engine protection. Deeply embedded dirt is never released by tapping. It
is always safer to keep operating until you can change to a fresh filter.

3. Never judge your element’s life by looking
at it


While carbon contamination is not visible to the eye, you can’t see the
dirt that’s embedded deep within the filter paper. The most cost effective
way for lowest filter maintenance costs and best engine performance is to fit
a restriction gauge.

4. Never leave an air cleaner open longer than
necessary


Your open air cleaner is a direct entry to your engine. If the cleaner is not
going to be change or reassembled immediately, cover the opening. The only way
to be sure nothing got in is to be sure nothing gets in.

5. Don’t overlook a worn or damaged gasket
in the housing


If your cleaner has a cover gasket, replace it with a new one. Always check
to be sure no piece of the old gasket remains in the housing and that the gasket
in not worn. If your filter model calls for a new gasket with each use, never
reuse the old one.

6. Don’t use a dented or bunched filter
element


Never install a dented or punctured element, because it cannot protect against
contamination. A dent can make a firm seal impossible or can indicate damaged
media. An element with bunched pleats reduces engine power and increases fuel
costs.

7. Never use a warped cover on a housing

Replace with a new cover as soon as possible. A warped or damaged cover cannot
make a proper seal. Also check to make sure there is no damage to the air cleaner
housing that could cause a leak.

8. Never substitute an incorrect element model
number


Elements may look almost identical but can differ by a fraction of an inch in
length—a difference that makes a firm seal impossible. You’re always
better off using the dirty element until you can get the correct model.



FUEL FILTER INSTALLATION INSTRUCTION SPIN ON FILTERS


Before Installation

1. Unscrew and remove the old filter.

2. Remove the old filter gasket if still attached to base.

3. Remove the old thread seal gasket if present.

4. Wipe filter mounting base/head with a clean cloth.

 

Image
Installation Instructions

1. Fill the new filter with clean fuel.

2. Apply a thin film of motor oil to the new filter gasket. Do not use grease.

3. To avoid cross-threading, line up the filter threads to the mounting base/head
carefully. Screw the new filter on until the gasket contacts the base.

4. Follow the instructions on the filter for final tightening torque specification.

 

After Installation

Start engine and check for leaks. Correct the source of leaks if any are observed.

 


 
CARTRIDGE FILTER
Before Installation

1. Remove drain plug or open petcock to drain fuel, water and any settled dirt
from the canister. Replace drain plug.

2. Loosen center bolt and remove canister and cartridge/element from assembly.

3. Drain and discard used cartridge/element and remove old gasket from base.
Clean canister and base assembly.

4. Install new gasket in base and replace any other worn or damaged gaskets,
washer or seals.

5. Place new filter cartridge into canister assembly.

6. Reinstall canister and tighten center bolt to proper torque.

 

After Installation

Start engine and check for leaks. Correct the source of leaks if any observed.



LUBE FILTER INSTALLATION INSTRUCTION
SPIN ON FILTERS

Before Installation

1. Unscrew and remove the old filter.

2. Remove the old filter gasket if still attached to base.

3. Wipe filter mounting base/head with a clean cloth.


Image

Installation Instructions

1. Check the gasket of the new filter to be sure it is properly seated in the
groove.

2. Apply a thin film of motor oil to the new filter gasket. Do not use grease.

3. To avoid cross-threading, line up the filter threads to the mounting base/head
carefully. Screw the new filter on until the gasket contacts the base.

4. Follow the instructions on the filter for final tightening torque specification.


After Installation


1. Be sure the oil reaches the full level on the dipstick.

2. Start engine and check for leaks. Correct the source of leaks if any are
observed.

3. Shut the engine off and recheck the oil level. Add oil if needed.


CARTRIDGE FILTER
Before Installation

1. Loosen center bolt and remove canister and cartridge/element assembly.

2. Drain and discard used cartridge/element and remove old gasket from base.
Clean canister and base assembly.

3. Install new gasket in base and replace any other worn or damaged gaskets,
washer or seals.

5. Place new filter cartridge into canister assembly.

6. Reinstall canister and tighten center bolt to proper torque.

 

After Installation

1. Be sure the oil reaches the full level on the dipstick.

2. Start engine and check for leaks. Correct the source of leaks if any are
observed.

3. Shut the engine off and recheck the oil level. Add oil if needed.



FUEL SYSTEM MAINTENANCE

 

Functions of the Diesel Fuel

Powers

Cools

Lubricates

 


Diesel Fuel Water Contamination Types of Water

Contamination in Fuel 

 

Free Water

Emulsified Water
Problems

Ice Crystallization

Filter Plugging

Fuel Starvation

Engine Parts Damage

Effects


Poor Storage Conditions

Leaks

Condensation
Fuel System Recommendations

Keep dirt away

Keep water out

Keep air out

Keep fuel pump to factory specs

Keep fuel flowing

Use high capacity Fuel Filter of Fuel Filter Water Separator

FUNCTIONS OF THE LUBE OIL SYSTEM
Lubricates

Lubrication is the primary function of lube oil. The oil forms an oil film that
prevents contact & reduces friction.

 

Cools

Heat Transfer Medium. The oil absorbs heat through contact with internal parts
and releases heat to primary cooling at the oil cooler.

 

Seals

The oil serves as a combustion and contamination seal.

 

Cleans

The oil prevents build-up combustion products and flushes products of oxidation.

 

Protects

Lube oil helps protect the system from oxidation (rust) and dissimilar metals
(galvanic corrosion).


TROUBLESHOOTING PLUGGED LUBE/OIL FILTERS

 

A plugged filter is not a filter problem. A plugged filter indicates excessive
contamination of oil and requires oil and filter change and the elimination
of the contamination source.

 


90% of plugged filters are caused by moisture or coolant in the oil.


Indications:

Wavy “s’ shaped pleats

Deteriorated outer wrap

Gel or sludge

Plugged appearance

Unusual color

 


 100% of plugged filters are caused by engine related source.

Indications:

Overuse : black, plugged appearance

Oil breakdown : reddish-brown color-oxidation (rust)

Fuel Dilution : Brown Color, fuel smell, thinned oil

Wear Debris : shiny particles